Explore Culture

Explore Culture

Hong Kong is rich with culture everywhere you look. From temples to heritage sites, and museums to tea appreciation, it’s definitely worth your while to spend time immersing yourself in the local culture.

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Cantonese Opera
(22.311962, 114.170706)
Chi Lin Nunnery
(22.340425, 114.204344)
Discover Feng Shui
(22.280288, 114.159465)
Hong Kong Heritage Museum
(22.378213, 114.185279)
Hong Kong Maritime Museum
(22.286934, 114.162046)
Hong Kong Museum of Art
(22.293757, 114.172169)
Hong Kong Museum of History
(22.302254, 114.177304)
Hong Kong Science Museum
(22.301370, 114.177662)
Lover's Rock
(22.271424, 114.176596)
Man Mo Temple
(22.284218, 114.150179)
Nan Lian Garden
(22.339487, 114.205339)
Pak Tai Temple
(22.280148, 114.174000)
Po Lin Monastery
(22.255754, 113.908106)
Shrine of the Earth God
(22.446736, 114.005833)
Tai Chi
(22.359329, 114.131836)
Tea Appreciation
(22.280648, 114.170846)
The Big Buddha
(22.256922, 113.905242)
Tsui Shing Lau Pagoda
(22.449043, 114.006145)
Wong Tai Sin Temple
(22.343020, 114.193218)
Yeung Hau Temple
(22.457281, 114.006025)
Yu Kiu Ancestral Hall
(22.445202, 114.008036)
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Cantonese Opera

Witness Kaleidoscopic costumes, distinctive falsetto singing punctuated by gongs, and intricate gestures rich with symbolism.

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Pak Tai Temple

This cultural gem contains gold-plated woodcraft dating from the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911) and a Song Dynasty (960–1279) iron sword. The sculpted dragons adorning the roof are classic Chinese architectural features.

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Tea Appreciation

From the gentle aroma of chrysanthemum tea to the more complex flavours of green tea, we use a wide variety of brews for all sorts of reasons.

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Feng Shui

Many people in Hong Kong believe that good feng shui can attract prosperity and ward off bad luck. You can find feng shui in practice almost everywhere you turn in Hong Kong.

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Nan Lian Garden

Built in the style of the Tang dynasty, discover this scenic garden meticulously landscaped over an area of 3.5 hectares.

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Wong Tai Sin Temple

Home to three religions (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism), its natural setting and beautifully ornamented buildings make it as much a scenic attraction as an important religious centre.

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The Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery

Sitting 34 metres high and facing north to look over the Chinese people, this majestic bronze Buddha draws pilgrims from all over Asia.

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Man Mo Temple

The Man Mo Temple is a picturesque tribute to the God of Literature (Man) and the God of War (Mo), both of whom were worshipped by ambitious students looking to succeed in the civil examinations of Imperial China.

It’s easy to see that Vietnam has a rich and lengthy history that’s worth exploring. Perhaps this is most evident when looking at the sheer numbers of pagodas, temples, and palaces that are strewn across this beautiful nation.

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Independence Palace/ Reunification Palace
(10.778055, 106.696809)
Jade Emperor Pagoda
(10.792313, 106.698055)
Pagoda of the Celestial Lady
(16.454541, 107.544631)
Temple of Literature
(21.027979, 105.835482)
Trấn Quốc Pagoda
(21.048219, 105.836819)
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Trấn Quốc Pagoda

Trấn Quốc Pagoda, in Hanoi, was originally constructed in the sixth century, which makes it the oldest pagoda in the city, and a must-visit when you’re there.

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Pagoda of the Celestial Lady

If you find that you too love pagodas, then you want to make sure you also set eyes on the Pagoda of the Celestial Lady in Huế. It’s seven stories in height, and many residents would say it is the icon of the city, and it’s not hard to see why.

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Jade Emperor Pagoda

Jade Emperor Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City, which is actually a Taoist pagoda deemed so beautiful and atmospheric that even Barack Obama paid a visit during his trip to Vietnam in 2016.

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Temple of Literature

Temple of Literature in Hanoi is magnificent. It’s a Confucius temple, which actually hosts the first university that was established in Vietnam way back in the eleventh century.